HGV Theory Test Practice

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Mock HGV Theory Test


The duration of this mock HGV Theory Test is 115 minutes (1 hour 55 minutes). There are 100 multiple-choice questions. You need 85/100 to pass. You may check answers after each question or you can wait until the end of the test for your results. Good luck!

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About the HGV Theory Test

The HGV theory test consists of two sections:

  1. Part 1a: A 2-hour multiple-choice test with 100 questions costing £26, and;
  2. Part 1b: A 30-minute hazard perception test with 19 clips including 20 scorable hazards, costing £11.

These tests do not have to be sat on the same day, but must be completed within 2 years of each other. If you do sit them on the same day, you can do them in whichever order you prefer. However, they must both be passed before you can move on to taking your practical test. The HGV theory test is designed to examine how much you know about everything affecting driving HGVs / LGVs. This means there are broad areas of knowledge you will need to understand. These broad areas are outlined below.

Knowledge Areas

Measurements

You will need to know the length, width, height, and weight of HGVs / LGVs.

Why you need to know about it – Awareness of the size and weight of your vehicle ensures you are aware of which roads you are able to safely travel on. You will also be able to recognise when restrictions apply.

Driving hours & resting period regulations

You will need to know the rules in relation to rest periods and drivers’ hours. You will need to learn about driving limits, how to follow the tachograph rules, how to keep good records, and keeping your vehicle safe and secure.

Why you need to know about it – You need to be aware of legal requirements to ensure you obey the law and a safe to drive.

Braking systems

You need to learn about the 3 main braking systems on lorries – service, secondary, and parking. You will also need to learn how to take care of air brake systems, how to carry out emergency stops, and how to use escape lanes.

Why you need to know about it – You will need to know how to use them, look after them effectively with proper maintenance, and to understand why this is important.

Measurements

You will need to know the length, width, height, and weight of HGVs / LGVs.

Why you need to know about it – Awareness of the size and weight of your vehicle ensures you are aware of which roads you are able to safely travel on. You will also be able to recognise when restrictions apply.

Restricted views

You need to be aware that some areas around your vehicle will be restricted from your view. The view of other road users may also be restricted due to the size and dimensions of your vehicle.

Why you need to know about it – You need to be aware of this so that you take appropriate positions up on the road and so you and others can drive safely.

Vehicle condition

You will need to be able to spot defects and faults on your vehicle.

Why you need to know about it – AIt is your responsibility to report faults and defects when you notice them.

Safe & secure loading

You will need to understand about how to load a vehicle safely and securely.

Why you need to know about it – You will need to be aware of this in order to safely transport goods and recognise when you may need to use special signs to warn of dangerous loads.

Other road users

You need to be aware of how to carry out manoeuvres and take account of the extra length of your vehicle when turning.

Why you need to know about it – This will help you reduce the risks involved when you are overtaking or when other road users overtake you. It will also help you manage difficult conditions more safely for yourself and others.

Manoeuvres

You need to be aware of how to carry out manoeuvres and take account of the extra length of your vehicle when turning.

Why you need to know about it – You will need to know this so you can manage blind spots and safely carry out manoeuvres in traffic.

Incidents, accidents, and emergencies

It is important to know what to do if you are involved in an accident or if you arrive at one. You will also need to know the safety equipment you are required to carry, how to report an incident, how to deal with fires, and tunnel safety.

Why you need to know about it – This will ensure you are able to help out if needed or know what actions to take if you have been involved to ensure yours and other road users’ safety.

Driver safety

You need to be aware of everything about driver safety from seatbelts, anticipating the road movements of other road users, and potential dangers when exiting your vehicle cab on the offside. You also need to consider driver tiredness, medication, and the importance of not using mobile phones.

To protect yourself and other road users and to meet legal requirements.

Essential documents

You will need to learn about the necessary documentation and regulations in relation to SORN, CPC, and MAM.

Why you need to know about it – You need to learn this because it is the driver’s responsibility. This will ensure you understand what licence categories mean and the restrictions on them. This will ensure you meet legal requirements and avoid fines.

Road and traffic signs

Your knowledge of road signs, road and lane markings, traffic lights, warnings, and signals that may be given by other drivers or the police.

Why you need to know about it – To ensure you can safely and effectively respond to vital instructions on the road and from other road users.

The road

You will need to understand the effect of different weather conditions on the road, how to park safely at night, how to use and change lanes, and how to deal with road gradients.

Why you need to know about it – In order that you are able to reduce risk at all times in all conditions.

The Examination Process

Part 1a – Multiple choice test

The multiple-choice test lasts a total of 2 hours and usually takes place on a touch screen computer. You have 5 minutes set aside for instructions on what to do at the beginning. You can also use this period of five minutes to get comfortable with the touch screen computer and see how the multiple-choice questions will be laid out.

You will then have 1 hour and 55 minutes to answer 100 questions about the 14 areas outlined above. You will have a choice of responses to choose from for each question which will be asked individually. You can select the answer you think is correct either by touching the screen or by using a mouse. Sometimes, more than one answer may be given. You will be reminded of this if you try to move on without clicking on the correct number of answers for a given question. However, if you are unsure about a question and want to move on, you can flag it to return to later on in the test.

To pass the HGV theory test, you will need to get 85 out of 100.

There are 14 topics from which the questions will be drawn from:

  • Braking systems – Types of braking system, using your brakes properly, connecting the airlines, maintenance and inspection
  • Drivers’ hours and rest periods – Obeying driving limits, following tachograph rules, keeping the correct records, tiredness, vehicle security
  • Environmental issues – Reducing fuel consumption and emissions, road surfaces, refuelling
  • Essential documents – Documentation, regulations, the driver’s responsibility
  • Incidents, accidents and emergencies – Breakdowns, what to do at the scene of an incident, dealing with a vehicle fire, reporting an incident, safety in tunnels
  • Leaving the vehicle – Parking, leaving the cab, health and safety, security
  • Other road users – Being aware of other road users, showing patience and care
  • Restricted view – Mirrors and blind spots, awareness of your vehicle’s size, reversing large vehicles
  • Road and traffic signs – Signs, road markings, lane markings, traffic lights and warnings, signals given by drivers and the police
  • The driver – Consideration towards other road users, safety equipment, mobile phones when driving, fitness to drive, medication
  • The road – Different weather conditions, parking at night, using lanes, dealing with gradients, reducing risk
  • Vehicle condition – Wheels and tyres, vehicle maintenance and minor repairs, cold weather, trailer coupling
  • Vehicle loading –  Security of loads, weight distribution, transporting loads
  • Vehicle weights and dimensions – Vehicle size, loading your vehicle, vehicle markings, speed limiters

Part two – Hazard Perception Test (Module 1b)

The hazard perception test lasts up to 25 minutes. It will begin with a short video tutorial video outlining how the test will work. If you miss anything, you can re-run the video again if you need to.

When you are ready, the test will begin. There are 19 video clips in the test. These all feature everyday scenes you might expect to find on the road. There is a total of 20 developing hazards across the 19 clips with each video containing at least one. As there are 20 developing hazards in 19 clips, one of them will have a second developing hazard for you to look out for.

There is a 10-second pause between each clip which allows you to survey the scene. The faster you respond to developing hazards, the better score you will get. In the test, you’ll need to respond to the developing hazards early. The top score for the fastest response to a hazard is five. However, the scenario will not change after you click. Instead, a red flag will appear at the bottom of your screen. This indicates your response has registered. If you have too many flags, you may be penalized.

Unlike the theory test, your hazard perception responses cannot be reviewed. This is because you will only have one chance to react when it comes to driving on the road for real and in your practical test.

You will need 67 out of 100 to pass the hazard perception test.

After the test

After the hazard perception test, you will be asked to answer some simple customer survey questions followed by some potential future sample questions. You are not required to answer these questions but if you do, any of the information you give will remain both anonymous and confidential. If you do take the sample questions, they will not change your test results.

After passing

On the day, you will receive a letter detailing your results for whichever part of the theory test that has been completed.

Once both parts are passed, a theory test certificate will be sent to you in the post. This has a theory test number on it which you will need to provide when booking your practical test. However, the test certificate is only valid for 2 years and there are no exceptions for this.

Modules 1a and 1b can be taken in any order, and at different sittings, but you must pass both modules to pass the theory test. Should you be required to take the CPC Module 2 case studies test, you may sit this test either before or after completing both theory test modules. You must have passed both the theory test and, if applicable, the case studies test to enable you to take the practical test.